Tag Archives: Marketing

The Gift of Creativity

I ran across this online presentation today in my web wanderings, and thought of you.

I hope it gives you information and rejuvenation to start the new year fulfilled!

Creator Seth Godin is a blogger that I follow and respect, and not only has he invited wonderful content, he is using his internet marketing savvy to give the gift of awareness to lots of his colleagues. I can only hope to replicate this cleverness someday.

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Book Review: e-Riches 2.0

I’m reading a lot this summer. It’s summer. That’s what you’re supposed to do, right? Well, there’s no beach involved, but I’m on goodreads if you care to sign in and find my lists or keep your own.

e -Riches 2.0: Next-Generation Marketing Strategies for Making Millions Online by Scott Fox is a good book for organizations wondering why and beginning to get into the social media scene.

e-Riches covers the what, why and how of some of the most popular social networking sites like Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, LinkedIn and social news. With a bent towards marketing and business. But nonprofits market, and nonprofits are in business, so go forth and find this one to learn how public relations have changed, how you can measure your marketing program, and touches on higher-level topics like search-engine optimization, posting information content that can be freely accessed, and using video and advertising to drive more traffic to your site..

The book reiterates key points like:

  • Social media is just one PART of an overall marketing strategy.
  • Don’t forget that e-mail is still the number one social media tool.
  • MySpace is not where it’s at for most businesses.
  • You gotta build the crowd through multiple means.

Specific examples of each strategy are included, but this is not a book to devote hours and hours to pouring over. Rather, I find it useful as a skimmable reference for newbies or those looking to integrate social media to other parts of their organization.

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Teens & Media

Mobile technologies are a great way to reach teen audiences.
Even if you aren’t pondering a texting campaign, the following provide some pretty good insights to the changing world around us.

See slides of the Nielsen report findings, Kids on the Go: Mobile Usage by U.S. Teens and Tweens is a 2008 report from Nielsen Mobile that finds:
58% of tweens who download or watch TV on their phone do so at home;
64% of tweens who download or play music on their phone do so at home;
56% of tweens who access the Internet on their phone do so at home.

Another excerpt of the report says:
46% of tweens use cell phones.
On average, kids get their own cell phone between the ages of 10 and 11.
55% of tweens who own a cell phone send text messages and 21% download ringtones.

The report itself seems a bit elusive, but Nielsen’s How Teens Use Media (registration required) is from June 2009 and covers a broad spectrum of media, not just cell phones and texting.

Some surprising findings include:
Teens spend less time browsing the internet than adults.
TV watching is NOT being abandoned in favor of new media.
Teens read newspapers and magazines, and are still attracted by ads, and are the largest segment of movie-goers.
The typical U.S. teenager sends and receives nearly 100 text messages a day.
Of course they consume a lot of media–teens are early adopters of all technology, thus the term ‘digital native.’

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Facebook Ads for Fun (not Profit)

A month or so ago, a volunteer Facebook Page admin & I decided to play around with some Facebook ads for our Page. He had done the research on the ins-and-outs of successful ads, and since the cost was mere change, we decided to spend $25 in the name of experimentation.

We used GoogleDocs to collaborate to draft up some ads, pick target audiences, determine run times, and choose our daily and overall ad spending caps. Ads can be targeted by age, location (even city), education, interests, etc. For example, Facebook could tell us that in our targeted area, there were 81,000+ users who listed some variation of hostel or travel in their interests, so we knew that to be our potential market going in.

Facebook Ad Test
62 viewers went to the trouble of clicking on our 2 ads. Facebook reports a huge number of ‘impressions’ or times the ad appeared on pages–like 172,000 for our two ads, targeted to ‘travelers’ over 5 days.

But do you ever even look at the ads?? I mentally block them out. And I assume you do, too, which is why purchasing Facebook ads is a questionable tactic. Only .03% of our impressions were ever clicked.

Perhaps that was because we way under-bid the suggested ‘price per click’–we picked $0.43. Currently going at $0.70-0.90, our averages turned out to be $0.35-0.41 cents per click. But hey, this was an experiment, right?!

Our ad readers had listed their interests as: traveling (18 clickers), reading, (17), music (14; hmmm…this one is interesting), travel (11) and photography (10). 50% of viewers were women…60% of viewers were women under age 44. As targeted, most viewers were from Colorado, Nebraska & Utah.

Oh, yeah, I also spent a crazy amount of time tracking down coupon codes for free ads, searching for ‘free facebook ads’, none of which ever worked, but by the time I got to the ad set-up stage to try out the codes, I was already time-invested and committed to clicking a few more buttons to start the ads.

I’ll admit, I’m often wow-ed by numbers, though, that I later can’t explain or make sense of.

What I do know is that I spent a grand total of $24.89. We had better success with a slightly higher rate per click, and on the ad that ran over the weekend.

From “Pimp my Nonprofit….”, “Facebook knows an extraordinary amount about its users and can provide very targeted ads, which is pretty frightening” (agreed!), but could be effective for the right market, say–reaching students interested in internships. The time in analyzing such ads is similar to analyzing a GoogleAdWords campaign–without knowing much about these, either analysis seems like another great internship opportunity, to me.

Facebook ads for fun…. And measuring sector interest. And adding a few (but not your most loyal, perhaps) fans–like direct mail solicitation for Facebook. And to understand the strategy behind the machine.

Some others’ notes on the subject:
• General business strategy thoughts from Forrester Research’s Jeremiah Owyang
• Kivi Leroux Miller’s EcoScribe Communications Online Marketing for Nonprofits

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Meet. Up.

I’ve finally taken the Meetup.com plunge.
Meetup logo

I’ve been a lurker, joining some groups around town, and even a few in other places just to see how different groups operate. I’ve even attended a few area meetups. Wow–was that a personal challenge for this introvert, or what?! I feel comfortable with the online interface as a user, so I figured it was time to start a group.

Oh, that, and I have some fabulous volunteers who are interested in managing and hosting groups!
That’s key to my outreach strategy for non-profits. It can be overwhelming managing all of these social networking tools. So I crafted some volunteer descriptions specific to meetups, and they’ve just been waiting for the right souls to fill them.

I’ll keep you posted, but wanted you to check out Meetup and share if you’ve had any experiences with joining or running groups of your own. And has anyone done this in relationship to a nonprofit?

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Why You’ll Be Behind If You Don’t Adopt Now

Today I received this email from Emma Williams, Managing Editor, Schmap Guides:
I am delighted to let you know that your photo has been selected for inclusion in the newly released sixth edition of our Schmap Los Angeles Guide:
Getty Center

If you use an iPhone or iPod touch, then this same link will take you directly to your photo in the iPhone version of our guide. On a desktop computer, you can still see exactly how your photo is displayed and credited in the iPhone version of our guide at:
Getty Center

Thanks so much for letting us include your photo – please enjoy the guide!

I must confess, Emma and I have emailed previously.
Once.

When ‘she’ wrote to ask if I would give permission for them to use my photo. The photo I’d posted to a Flickr group for Hostelling International. The group is a place for Rocky Mountain folks to post travel pictures, and I had shared a pic I’d taken of the Getty Center in Los Angeles.

HOW Schmap found me & my pic (the theoretical how, not the actual searching for photos tagged with ‘Los Angeles’ at Flickr) is mind-boggling. Not to mention the logistical coordination of obtaining permission, interfacing Flickr photos with a map, and essentially publishing a travel guide.
The genius of this is multi-faceted. And that’s not even dwelling on the marketing side of things!
Now here I am, marketing their albeit free travel map. Made you look, didn’t I?!

If organizations can throw something as innocent as a photo to the proverbial internet wind, and it can get caught up in the maelstrom of viral marketing, there’s no telling where that might lead, am I right??

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Book Review: Facebook Marketing

Facebook Marketing: Leverage Social Media to Grow Your Business by Steven Holzner was just published in 2008, but is already outdated since Facebook’s Pages update last week.

Nevertheless, it’s a fine tutorial for those bewildered by the many menus and aspects of Facebook’s user interface. I’d recommend it to anyone who’s spent the requisite 2 minutes setting up an account and wonders ‘Now what?!’

Chapters 1-4 walk you through (albeit with some outdated screen shots) setting up your account’s bells and whistles, and gives good detail on how and why to create groups, pages and events. There’s a chapter explaining ads, should you be interested in exploring paid promotion of your Facebook pages. If you have a savvy computer programmer, there’s an overview of developing Facebook applications, too.

Despite the rapidly changing social networking scene, Facebook Marketing serves as a useful primer to the beginning user, and even clarifies some more elusive Facebook aspects such as profile security, event invites, and searching for similar groups. There’s also coverage of Facebook Marketplace, which remains an arena I’m not willing to explore as it seemingly has little to no application to non-profits.

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